Solutions to Violent Conflict

Archive for the ‘North Korea’ Category

Negotiating with North Korea: The Current Context


In North Korea, Nuclear disarmament, Sanctions and Security on March 21, 2012 at 12:24 pm

Stephen W. Bosworth

I have been dealing with North Korea since the 1990s, when we tried to implement the Agreed Framework, and later when I served as the U.S. Ambassador in Seoul. When I returned to active service as the Special Representative to North Korea in 2009-2011, I observed fundamental differences between what it was like trying to deal with the nuclear issue in the 1990s and what it is like now.

The most significant difference is that North Korea can now claim, with some degree of credibility, that it possesses nuclear weapons. Pyongyang has not said how many weapons it has or whether it can deliver them, but it undoubtedly has nuclear weapons. This has changed the way we try to deal with the North and how other countries in the region try to deal with them. Read the rest of this entry »

Sanctions and Incentives in North Korea: A Challenging Environment

In North Korea, Nuclear disarmament, Sanctions and Security on March 21, 2012 at 12:23 pm

"We have nuclear weapons," ceremony in North Korea. (Michael Day/Flickr)

George A. Lopez

The new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has come to power in a fledgling nuclear state that thus far has resisted pressures from the West and the Security Council to denuclearize. As he scans the political horizon, Kim may arrive at several conclusions about his inherited situation that affect how he thinks about his options. Read the rest of this entry »

Reciprocal Bargaining: The Best Hope for Denuclearization

In North Korea, Nuclear disarmament, Sanctions and Security on March 21, 2012 at 12:23 pm

David Cortright and Linda Gerber-Stellingwerf

The history of nonproliferation teaches that nations must be persuaded rather than forced to give up nuclear weapons capability. This is a difficult challenge with a regime as truculent as North Korea, where the primary U.S. policy is one of isolation and sanctions. The success of sanctions depends not on their severity but on how they are mixed with incentives as part of a diplomatic strategy.

Over the decades more than two dozen countries have decided not to acquire or maintain weapons of mass destruction. Security assurances and positive inducements played an important role in most of these nonproliferation decisions. Read the rest of this entry »