Solutions to Violent Conflict

The UN, the EU, the U.S.: The Triumph of ‘Team Work’

In Uncategorized on February 9, 2017 at 1:17 pm

Clara Portela is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Singapore Management University and Visiting Professor at the College of Europe.

When the Iran nuclear deal was signed, it was celebrated as a diplomatic success, especially for the United States. Media reports focused on the image of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry negotiating the deal. However, closer inspection reveals that it was not exclusively U.S. action that was responsible for the success. In the absence of the contributions made by the European Union (EU) and the United Nations (UN), the dispute over the Iranian nuclear file would not have been resolved. The process that led to the much-applauded agreement involved a complex interaction of three international actors in an example of felicitous ‘team-work’.

The EU took the lead in negotiating with Tehran and worked to engage Washington in the diplomatic process, after the U.S. administration had long ruled out direct contacts with Iran.

Trump Should Support, Not Disrupt, the Iran Deal

In Uncategorized on February 9, 2017 at 1:17 pm

peace-policy

Kelsey Davenport is Director for Nonproliferation Policy at the Arms Control Association.

Donald Trump faces a tough array of foreign policy challenges, but noticeably absent from that list is the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran. If Trump plays his cards right, he can keep Iran’s nuclear program off the table for the duration of his presidency. But that will require supporting, not disrupting, the highly-effective multilateral nuclear agreement the United States and its partners reached with Iran in 2015.

Before following through on threats to tear up the agreement or renegotiate it, Trump should review the Iran deal’s scorecard for the past 18 months.

The Leverage Embedded in the Iran Deal

In Uncategorized on February 9, 2017 at 1:17 pm

George Lopez is the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., Professor Emeritus of Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

Since the election of Donald Trump, members of the arms control community have argued that the new administration must keep the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action [JCPOA] based on the unprecedented compliance of the Iranians in fulfilling each part of their pledge to denuclearize. Those touting the success and benefits of the agreement note that the United Nations Security Council endorsed the JCPOA by approving Security Council Resolution (SCR) 2231 (January 2016), following certification by the International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA] that Iran was in full compliance with the provisions of the agreement.

Unfortunately, in an Administration that eschews facts and is committed to implementing policy via swift proclamations and executive orders, the prima facie case for preserving the agreement because it works carries little weight.